Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum to Reopen Soon

The Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum's Focke-Wulf Fw 190 will soon be on display for the public again. (photo by Richard Mallory Allnutt)
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We received some very welcome information from Everett, Washington today with news that the Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum is due to open again in the near future following a three-year hiatus in operations. Now under new ownership, the magnificent collection hopefully has a much brighter future ahead of it than seemed likely just a short while ago, when the wholesale dispersement of its artifacts, gathered by the late Paul G. Allen, seemed imminent. While present details about the when and the how of the collection’s re-opening remain somewhat sparse at present, a brief social media statement issued this morning hints that the museum will feature some new additions for visitors to see. One can hope! We look forwards to further information, and will let our readers know more when it arrives.


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Another view inside the Flying Heritage & Combat Armor Museum which is due to open to the public again in the near future. (photo by Richard Mallory Allnutt)

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Richard Mallory Allnutt's aviation passion ignited at the 1974 Farnborough Airshow. Raised in 1970s Britain, he was immersed in WWII aviation lore. Moving to Washington DC, he frequented the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum, meeting aviation legends.

After grad school, Richard worked for Lockheed-Martin but stayed devoted to aviation, volunteering at museums and honing his photography skills. In 2013, he became the founding editor of Warbirds News, now Vintage Aviation News. With around 800 articles written, he focuses on supporting grassroots aviation groups.

Richard values the connections made in the aviation community and is proud to help grow Vintage Aviation News.

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About Richard Mallory Allnutt (Chief Editor) 1060 Articles
Richard Mallory Allnutt's aviation passion ignited at the 1974 Farnborough Airshow. Raised in 1970s Britain, he was immersed in WWII aviation lore. Moving to Washington DC, he frequented the Smithsonian’s National Air & Space Museum, meeting aviation legends. After grad school, Richard worked for Lockheed-Martin but stayed devoted to aviation, volunteering at museums and honing his photography skills. In 2013, he became the founding editor of Warbirds News, now Vintage Aviation News. With around 800 articles written, he focuses on supporting grassroots aviation groups. Richard values the connections made in the aviation community and is proud to help grow Vintage Aviation News.

4 Comments

  1. Great to hear it’s opening but terrible that it’s all moving to Arkansas in two years. Huge disservice for the PNW since it’s literally the only location for this kind of stuff.

    • G’Day OlFvet, It’s the only location for this kind of stuff anywhere, in a sense! I’ve traveled inter-continentally to see it, myself. I’ve learned that you’ve got to travel if you want to catch the highlights – and I reckon two years notice is a pretty good chance to have your fill. Go get it!

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